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Just Horse Riders

  • Budget Women's Breeches

    It is widely accepted that horse riding is an expensive hobby, with lesson fees and riding clothing to fork out for, the cost can quickly mount up. But it more and more brands are making the sport more accessible and bringing out budget ranges of clothing which are great for enhancing performance and more importantly, affordable! Just Horse Riders stock a huge range of women's breeches and we’ve listed some of the best value ones here.

    Dublin Supa Slender

    Designed for everyday riding and yard work, these women’s breeches come in a range of funky colours and styles to suit different tastes. Plum, Charcoal, Pink and Navy versions are all made from highly breathable, hardwearing fabric that makes them good for both light rides around the yard as well as dirtier hacks through marsh and forests. Their elasticated waistband provides superb levels of rider comfort and means they fit exceptionally well on all body types. By far the most appealing part of these trousers though is the price tag at a very cool £14.95!

    Saxon Warm-Up

    These women’s breeches come in 5 different designs which are all two-toned and feature a patterned seat. Made from 92% cotton and 8% elastane these comfortable and attractive leggings are durable enough for everyday riding and are smart enough to be worn at competitions making them ideal for riders of all abilities. Playful in their designs with polka dot, horseshoe and leaf prints, they are bound to turn some heads and have a high-end look to them. Coming in at just £18.95 these jodhpurs are great value and good looking.

    HyPERFORMANCE

    More traditional in style, these jodhpurs are one block colour and are available in black, navy, pink and beige and feature 2 pockets at the front and a double stitch seat panel at the back. With a sturdy YKK zip, belt holes and reinforced stitching, these women’s breeches are hardwearing enough to be worn every day and at competitions. At just £19.95 they are a must-have for any riding wardrobe.

  • How To Choose Riding Boots?

    Struggling to decide whether to buy short or long riding boots? Footwear plays a big part in the equestrian world and riding boots need to offer protection, comfort and safety for riders of all abilities. Although it is mostly down to personal preference, the equine experts at Just Horse Riders have put together a guide to short and long styles so you can make the best choice for your needs.

    Long Riding Boots

    Long or tall riding boots are designed to extend the leg and make a rider appear taller as well as being the more ‘traditional’ choice. Worn by royalty over the years, these regal boots are very quintessentially British and are a formal style shoe that should sit just below the knee when worn. These boots are ideal for those who are competing as they give an heir or professionality which may help in a discipline such as dressage where appearance is scored. Long boots are believed to offer more protection than shorter styles, as they protect more of the rider's leg from adverse weather and also help to prevent chafing and pinching from stirrup leathers. Many riders perceive long riding boots as a better choice for riding position also, as they restrict the ability to move and wiggle the feet and ankles.

    Short Riding Boots

    More popular amongst younger riders, short riding boots offer more freedom of leg and ankle movement which is ideal for younger riders or those who are beginners in learning to ride and kick their horse. This style of riding boot is ideal for riding around the yard but may offer less support and protection when in the saddle, but this can be mitigated by pairing them with chaps or gaitors which will offer additional support. Short styles are a good choice during the summer months as they cover less of the leg than longer styles which contributes to healthy temperature loss and is likely to keep the rider cooler and more comfortable on hot days.

    For more information about riding boots or to buy yours, visit our website.

  • A Guide to Anatomical Bridles

    Bridles are a key part of any horse’s tack and a comfortable and well-fitting one helps the horse and rider work together harmoniously. Anatomical bridles, in particular, are designed to work with the animal anatomy in mind, to minimise pressure and maximise effectiveness when it comes to riding. If you’re not sure whether or not your bridle is anatomical or whether you should purchase one, we’ve put together a guide on these pieces of tack.

    Anatomical Features

    Anatomical bridles can be identified by a few key features that make them stand out from traditional bridles. There are several variations but most of them will include at least one of the following: a headpiece, browband, cheek pieces, noseband, leather and/or fastenings. While many of these may sound like a traditional bridle there are few differences, let's delve a little deeper.

     Headpiece

    Anatomical bridles have all-in-one style crowns that have no additional straps passing over the poll, minimising the pressure points that are in contact with the headpiece. Usually wide, these bridles increase the surface area of traditional bridles and distribute pressure more evenly across the animal’s head, cut back behind the ears allowing greater movement of them.

    Nose Band

    There are a variety of noseband options with anatomical bridles that look similar to their traditional counterparts but are developed to relieve pressure and reduce friction around this tender part of the face. They often feature a padded crank fastening too which provides further comfort.

    Cheek Pieces

    Curved cheek pieces are a unique feature of anatomical bridles which are tailored to avoid the sensitive nerves that run alongside a horse’s cheek. These sensitive facial nerves are regularly put under pressure by traditional bridles and over long periods of wear, can cause huge discomfort for horses who may try and wriggle free and be less responsive to commands.

    For more information about anatomical bridles, visit our website.

  • Looking After Horses in Summer

    With the temperatures slowly warming up the time has come to start preparing for the summer heat and taking measures to ensure your horse remains comfortable throughout the season. With dry heat, humidity, shade, sunshine, supplements and flies to consider, ensuring your horse is equipped for the summer takes a multifaceted approach!

    Water

    A horse drinks around 45 litres of water per day and in warmer weather, this can increase by up to 40% so it is vital to make sure your horse always has access to water. Whether this means installing a larger trough in the stable or supplying a few more in the fields, horses need to have water nearby at all times. Studies have shown that limiting a horse’s water intake for as little as two hours can lead to an increased risk of colic and dehydration and so the importance of regular drinking is vital to overall health.

    Flies

    Flies are one of the biggest burdens that horses and riders have to bear during the summer and they too can affect a horse’s health. Drawn to moisture, they often congregate around the eyes of a horse and can even lay their eggs in their eyes, leading to infections. Use specialist riding equipment including fly veils to help prevent them from settling on your horse’s face and make sure you supply manure on the farm so that the flies will be drawn away from horses.

    Riding

    The summer can be the most enjoyable time to ride your horse, but it is important to employ the correct riding equipment to make the horse as comfortable as possible. A summer rug can help keep the sun off fair-skinned animals, preventing sunburn and helping to keep them cool when out in the field. As the horse is likely to sweat more on rides, using an exercise sheet beneath the saddle will prevent chaffing and friction from the tack.

    For more information or to buy riding equipment for the summer period, visit our website.

  • Preparing Mares to Be in Foal

    With foal season almost upon us, many horse owners are preparing for their new arrivals and ensuring they’re stocked up on all the new things a baby horse requires. During the new foal stage, it’s easy to get preoccupied with the needs of the new arrival, but the mare is also in need of a little extra attention so that she can stay well during the nursing and provide all the necessary nutrients the baby needs. So, how should you prepare your mare to be in foal?

     

    Assess the Body Condition

    A mare should be in optimal body condition at the time of breeding, which helps to ensure that both the mother and foal are strong enough to cope with the extreme exertion that occurs during birthing. While a thin horse is obviously at a higher risk of malnourishment and exhaustion, obesity can also negatively impact both animals, with recent studies suggesting foals born to obese mares have a higher risk of osteochondrosis and metabolic disorders. If your horse is under or overweight, speak to your veterinarian about the best course of action.

     

    Evaluate Nutrition

    Now more than ever, it is essential that a horse’s diet is well balanced and providing all the necessary nutrients to support milk production and overall wellbeing. If you are not sure your horse is getting the right number of vitamins and minerals, consider introducing some horse supplements to their diet. Most supplements are over-saturated with the key ingredient so that the horse’s body can absorb the necessary amount and will expel any extra.

     

    Teeth, Bones, Hair and Hooves

    All made from the same basic amino acid chains, the teeth, bones, hair and hooves of a horse can benefit from a little TLC in the form of a horse supplement. These areas become particularly under strain during pregnancy, especially the joints and hooves which face pressure from being under increased weight strain. Horse supplements for joints are readily available and are encouraged in the run-up to breeding, throughout pregnancy and after birth to keep the horse in a supple condition and prevent lameness.

  • Get a Shiny Coat Using Horse Supplements for Skin

    If you want your horse to have a shiny coat all year round that glistens in the sunlight and is always ready for the competition ring, then horse supplements for skin are a must. There are several different vitamins and minerals that contribute to a strong, shiny and healthy coat but some of them can be hard to get into a horse’s diet in the right quantities through diet. Thankfully, some supplements make achieving a beautiful coat simple and easy.

    Vitamins

    There are 3 key vitamins that help a horse to grow a strong and shiny coat and they’re the very same vitamins that human hair and bones rely on too. Vitamin A, D and E are all key horse supplements for skin, and each plays an important role. Vitamin D allows a horse to absorb more calcium from food, which strengthens hair and thickens individual strands for a thicker, sturdier coat. Vitamin A helps a horse mount an immune response which is key to fighting infections that can affect hair follicles and result in patchiness. Finally, vitamin E is an antioxidant which helps clear the body of damaging toxins and promotes glowing skin by reducing wear and tear from free radicals.

    Prebiotics

    While all of the vitamins are beneficial to skin both by being ingested or rubbed onto the horse, prebiotics are the internal line of defence against damage. Poor digestive healthy can increase inflammation throughout the body, hinder immunity and increase oxidative stress, which is bad for all elements of the body, but particularly the skin. Prebiotic horse supplements for skin help to encourage healthy flora in the gut which aids digestion, including the absorption of key nutrients.

    Cod Liver Oil

    Cod liver oil is extremely fatty and full of Omega 3 which helps add that lustful shine to a horse’s coat. This horse supplement for skin is well known for its healing and restorative properties and has been shown to stimulate hair follicles, which can prevent hair falling out, leading to an overall thicker coat if taken over time.

  • Get a Shiny Coat Using Horse Supplements for Skin

    If you want your horse to have a shiny coat all year round that glistens in the sunlight and is always ready for the competition ring, then horse supplements for skin are a must. There are several different vitamins and minerals that contribute to a strong, shiny and healthy coat but some of them can be hard to get into a horse’s diet in the right quantities through diet. Thankfully, some supplements make achieving a beautiful coat simple and easy.

     

    Vitamins

    There are 3 key vitamins that help a horse to grow a strong and shiny coat and they’re the very same vitamins that human hair and bones rely on too. Vitamin A, D and E are all key horse supplements for skin, and each plays an important role. Vitamin D allows a horse to absorb more calcium from food, which strengthens hair and thickens individual strands for a thicker, sturdier coat. Vitamin A helps a horse mount an immune response which is key to fighting infections that can affect hair follicles and result in patchiness. Finally, vitamin E is an antioxidant which helps clear the body of damaging toxins and promotes glowing skin by reducing wear and tear from free radicals.

     

    Prebiotics

    While all of the vitamins are beneficial to skin both by being ingested or rubbed onto the horse, prebiotics are the internal line of defence against damage. Poor digestive healthy can increase inflammation throughout the body, hinder immunity and increase oxidative stress, which is bad for all elements of the body, but particularly the skin. Prebiotic horse supplements for skin help to encourage healthy flora in the gut which aids digestion, including the absorption of key nutrients.

     

    Cod Liver Oil

    Cod liver oil is extremely fatty and full of Omega 3 which helps add that lustful shine to a horse’s coat. This horse supplement for skin is well known for its healing and restorative properties and has been shown to stimulate hair follicles, which can prevent hair falling out, leading to an overall thicker coat if taken over time.

  • Why Does My Horse Need Joint Supplements?

    Horse supplements for joints can help your horse to age better, move more easily and reduce the chances of arthritis, which can be devastating for a horse. As a heavy animal, spends a lot of time standing up and works hard, whether at racing, competing or riding, horses joints come under a lot of exertion over the years which can lead to lameness which often results in them being put down. No horse owner wants this to become a reality and so introducing horse supplements that strengthen the boned and joints is always a good idea, no matter how young the horse.

     

    Understanding the Joint

    While horses are powerful animals that are built for moving, we often ask them to go above and beyond and their joints are, unfortunately, not built to last. A joint is made up of 2 or more bones that work together to support movement and transfer weight and they can be described as fibrous, cartilaginous or synovial. It’s the latter type of joint, that are continually absorbing impact and as a result are the first to wear – these joints need to stay lubricated in order to remain flexible and so horse supplements for joints that encourage this are the most supportive to the overall health of the animal.

     

    Common Issues

    There are 3 main problems that blight horses’ joints: bone chips, osteoarthritis and osteochondrosis. Bone chips happen in the knees and front fetlock and the chipped bone floats within the joint causing pain. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease that can impact horses of all ages and activity levels and causes the cartilage to break down causing bone on bone friction. Osteochondrosis is a developmental condition that effects young horses that causes soft cartilage cells to become hard bone cells, making the cartilage thick and causing weakness in the affected joints.

     

    Take a look at our website to find a range of horse supplements for joints that are suitable for all disciplines.

  • Why Does My Horse Need Joint Supplements?

    Horse supplements for joints can help your horse to age better, move more easily and reduce the chances of arthritis, which can be devastating for a horse. As a heavy animal, spends a lot of time standing up and works hard, whether at racing, competing or riding, horses joints come under a lot of exertion over the years which can lead to lameness which often results in them being put down. No horse owner wants this to become a reality and so introducing horse supplements that strengthen the boned and joints is always a good idea, no matter how young the horse.

     

    Understanding the Joint

    While horses are powerful animals that are built for moving, we often ask them to go above and beyond and their joints are, unfortunately, not built to last. A joint is made up of 2 or more bones that work together to support movement and transfer weight and they can be described as fibrous, cartilaginous or synovial. It’s the latter type of joint, that are continually absorbing impact and as a result are the first to wear – these joints need to stay lubricated in order to remain flexible and so horse supplements for joints that encourage this are the most supportive to the overall health of the animal.

     

    Common Issues

    There are 3 main problems that blight horses’ joints: bone chips, osteoarthritis and osteochondrosis. Bone chips happen in the knees and front fetlock and the chipped bone floats within the joint causing pain. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease that can impact horses of all ages and activity levels and causes the cartilage to break down causing bone on bone friction. Osteochondrosis is a developmental condition that effects young horses that causes soft cartilage cells to become hard bone cells, making the cartilage thick and causing weakness in the affected joints.

     

    Take a look at our website to find a range of horse supplements for joints that are suitable for all disciplines.

  • Preparing Mares to Be in Foal

    With foal season almost upon us, many horse owners are preparing for their new arrivals and ensuring they’re stocked up on all the new things a baby horse requires. During the new foal stage, it’s easy to get preoccupied with the needs of the new arrival, but the mare is also in need of a little extra attention so that she can stay well during the nursing and provide all the necessary nutrients the baby needs. So, how should you prepare your mare to be in foal?

    Assess the Body Condition

    A mare should be in optimal body condition at the time of breeding, which helps to ensure that both the mother and foal are strong enough to cope with the extreme exertion that occurs during birthing. While a thin horse is obviously at a higher risk of malnourishment and exhaustion, obesity can also negatively impact both animals, with recent studies suggesting foals born to obese mares have a higher risk of osteochondrosis and metabolic disorders. If your horse is under or overweight, speak to your veterinarian about the best course of action.

    Evaluate Nutrition

    Now more than ever, it is essential that a horse’s diet is well balanced and providing all the necessary nutrients to support milk production and overall wellbeing. If you are not sure your horse is getting the right number of vitamins and minerals, consider introducing some horse supplements to their diet. Most supplements are over-saturated with the key ingredient so that the horse’s body can absorb the necessary amount and will expel any extra.

    Teeth, Bones, Hair and Hooves

    All made from the same basic amino acid chains, the teeth, bones, hair and hooves of a horse can benefit from a little TLC in the form of a horse supplement. These areas become particularly under strain during pregnancy, especially the joints and hooves which face pressure from being under increased weight strain. Horse supplements for joints are readily available and are encouraged in the run-up to breeding, throughout pregnancy and after birth to keep the horse in a supple condition and prevent lameness.

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